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Willowview Hill Farm


Welcome to Catskill Horse.

Welcome to The Merry Band at the Catskill Horse. We hope you enjoy browsing our monthly online magazine. This .org digital magazine, began as a community resource serving the North East region of the USA, and has grown to reach a national and even international audience. The complete source for everything horse with a bevy of archived educational articles, tips and advice for multi-riding disciplines for horse owners everywhere that encompasses everything horse and rural lifestyle related.

In addition to our Directory of useful services and horse lover articles check out our latest features Hit the Hay Accommodation Guide, The Feed Bucket Restaurant Guide, Horse and Home Real Estate Guide, Stallion Directory and Equine Art at the Catskill Horse. Plus coming soon our shopping choice guide! Come join our Merry Band at the Catskill Horse. And don't forget to check in at our Facebook page for our weekly Giveaway contests.


What's New in This Issue

Dominique’s Smiles Spreads Hope and Sunshine


Successful Stallion Selection Starts Here


Bringing Back Artisan Barn Design


Nikki Alvin-Smith

Editor's Welcome

 

How blissful it is to be the other side of winter and have the sun shine. The ongoing vaccine rollout offers an opportunity for us all to do our bit and help get things back on track in the USA to allow businesses and venues able to reopen and kick start the economy. It’s one time when being part of the herd can have an extremely positive effect for all.

The USEF has announced that their sanctioned events may enjoy a limited spectator attendance and racetracks are also set to enjoy a return of cheering fans and the financial support that comes with it.

There is much to smile about indeed!

Not everyone will be able to leave their hospital bed or nursing home. For some lockdown continues well past the Covid crisis in terms of their ability to get out and about freely. Debilitating illness or the infirmities of age or disability are very real and stepping up to do what we can to mitigate the stress and sorrowful stage of life that others have to endure can make all the difference. If you are thinking of making a donation or booking something meaningful to give back to your community consider the notion of bringing the pleasures of horse time to those in much need of something to feel happy about with a visit from a mini-therapy horse. The Merry Band at the Catskill Horse sat down with Sandy Smith, founder of Dominique’s Smiles, to share her inspirational story from racehorse trainer to mini-therapy horse trainer. It’s amazing what a difference one determined person can make in the lives of so many others and we urge you to support her mission.

The good weather is also a time to take action on plans that have laid dormant all winter. For the horse owner contemplating a new horse barn much excitement encircles their barn building project. While most of us wouldn’t dream of utilizing our horse barn for anything other than horse housing, there are many other fabulous uses for a barn. Event planners adore them for a myriad of occasions, agri-tourism businesses thrive on their presence and animal lovers of all creatures great and small embrace the barn as an extension of their active lifestyles.

The trending newcomer to the horse barn building mix is the timber frame hybrid that combines traditional artisan barn joinery and woodworking techniques with the convenience of modular construction. This innovative design is not to be missed. Take a look at our article on, “Bringing Back Artisan Barn Design,” for inspiration.

Spring heralds new life in all its forms. For horse owners long months of anticipation are rewarded with foals hitting the ground and plans for breeding mares back are front and center. Our article on stallion selection offers guidance for neophyte and experienced breeders alike, on the best way NOT to make a costly mistake when it comes to finding “Mr. Right” for your mare.

Don’t forget to check in at our news page for lots of horse lover information, see the winners of our monthly book contest and find new events to attend on our very popular events page.

With heartfelt gratitude to all our supporters, viewers and advertisers alike who have helped keep Catskill Horse growing this far. We look forward to many more years to come as we build this digital publication and continue to reach far and beyond New York.

If you write and would like to contribute; have news you would like to share about your organization or activities at your farm, please email info@CatskillHorse.org

Please to visit our Facebook page and keep up on current news and come join the chat at the Catskill Equestrian Group too.

Happy Riding!

Nikki Alvin-Smith
Editor
Catskill Horse Magazine
Publisher: Horse in a Kilt Media Inc.


Equine Disease Communication Center Serves Critical Role During Disease Outbreaks

Horse owners and others are encouraged to sign up for free alert service

EDCC LogoLEXINGTON, Ky. -The Equine Disease Communication Center (EDCC) is the “go-to” source for accurate and timely equine disease information, including the latest reports on outbreaks, such as EHV-1 in North America. Now in its sixth year, the EDCC continues its central role in helping control equine disease outbreaks by serving as an important horse health service and tool for horse owners, equine facility managers, veterinarians, state animal health officials and the equine industry.

Communication, traditionally, is one of the most significant challenges in containing and preventing disease spread, especially during an outbreak. This was especially true prior to launch of the EDCC in 2015, when nationwide coordination of disease outbreaks and confirmed cases was virtually non-existent. Read the full article...


Horse Brain Human BrainHillary Whitt Wins Catskill Horse Book Contest

Congratulations to Hillary Whitt, Of Leeds, New York, on her recent win of the Catskill Book Facebook Book Contest. The prize, the new title ‘Horse Brain Human Brain‘ written by Janet Jones PhD, and published and donated by Trafalgar Square Books, is an interesting read about neuroscience in horsemanship.

The Merry Band at the Catskill Horse is pleased to announce the new contest has already started, and a copy of ‘What Horses Really Want’ is up for grabs. Please visit our Facebook page to enter. It’s quick and easy! The winner will be announced on Facebook on August 31st.


7 Tips on Equine Conditioning with Biomechanics Expert Dr. Hilary Clayton

7 Tips on Equine Conditioning  There are many important questions pertaining to equine conditioning and fitness as we all look forward to returning to work. Dr. Hilary Clayton recently shared some cautions and considerations in a Skype interview with Equine Guelph. Dr. Clayton is a veterinarian, researcher and horsewoman. For the past 40 years she has been conducting amazing research in the areas of equine biomechanics and conditioning programs for equine athletes. Dr. Clayton has also been a guest speaker in Equine Guelph’s online course offerings.

1. What are the differences between conditioning and training?

• training is the technical preparation of the athlete
(learning the skills and movements they will need to perform in competition)
• conditioning strengthens the horse, progressively making them fit and able
• the goal of conditioning is to maintain soundness while maximizing performance. Read the full article...


Learn More About Horse Hay

Have you ever wondered where your hay comes from? In this episode, we learn about what it takes to produce the most important component of a horse’s diet. Plus, we learn about things like how to spot a good bale when you see one, how to measure moisture content, prevent spontaneous combustion, and more. Hay farmer, Nikki Alvin-Smith from Willowview Hill Farm Dressage, brings a ton of really interesting information.

 


Whole Food for Horses
Eleanor M. Kellon, VMD

The “whole food” claim is being used to market some feeds and supplements for horses, but what is a whole food and are these products really superior?
The term whole food is not currently regulated, so it can mean anything the company using it wants it to mean. “Whole food” was originally coined in the 1940s and referred to produce “without subtraction, addition or alteration”, harvested and eaten fresh, raised without pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers – in other words, both unprocessed and organic.

Whole food in horse products is definitely not the same as organic. If you don’t see the USDA seal of certification, it’s not organic. Non-GMO is not the same thing as organic either, and no guarantee the product does not contain chemicals even far more dangerous than glyphosate. Read the full article...


Creating a Diverse Healthy Pasture for Your Horse
By Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS

Creating a Diverse Healthy Pasture for Your HorseEquine health (and human health, for that matter) is closely intertwined with soil health. Soil health directly affects plant health and the nutrients available to the plants are absorbed in turn by horses. Healthy soil and healthy horses are therefore, inter-related. And microbial populations in the gut, called the microbiome, are also beneficiaries of this relationship.
 
Maintaining a healthy population of micro-organisms requires appropriate food, the correct environment and substrates (prebiotics) upon which to grow. In soil, the correct pH, minerals and organic matter all must be present. In the equine (and human) intestinal tract, the correct pH, minerals and soluble fibers (prebiotics) must all be present. Notice that the same basic ingredients are required whether the land is producing plants, or the horse/human is living. Current research is showing that the natural microbial population in the horse (and human) is primarily soil-based bacteria. So, eating a little bit of dirt is actually a good thing. Read the full article...


\Check Out Horse Radio Network Alumni Helena Harris Podcast Stall and Stable

Listen in for advice "Keeping a Grand Prix Dressage Horse".

Podcast

 


Catskill Horse T-Shirts & Notebooks Now Available

Catskill Horse T-Shirt

CatskillHorse.org Mugs

 

 

 

Catskill Horse is pleased to announce that we now have T-Shirts, mugs and notebooks with our own arty design available for purchase to help spread the word.

 

Buy any one of our products - choose from our 100% cotton T's or buy a mug or notebook.

Catskill Horse Notebook

T-Shirts are available in Womens Fitted S/M/L/Xl and Unisex S/M/L/XL/2XL for only $20 plus $6.50 S/H. If you are located in NY please add 8% sales tax.

 

Mugs: $12.95 plus $6.50 S/H. Please add 8% sales tax if you are located in NY.

 

These fun notebooks are available for $11.95 plus S/H fee of $2.00. Please also add 8% sales tax if located in NYS.

 

 

Checks should be payable to Horse in a Kilt Media Inc., and mailed to P.O. Box 404, Stamford, NY 12167. Please allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.

 

 

 

 

 


Vaccine Risks?

Here is some advice on what to look out for as your horse is administered vaccines this season. There have been reports of some serious adverse reactions this year, so be vigilant and ask your vet for their advice and specifically what adverse vaccine reports they have received through their channels.

It’s important to be able to distinguish between minor side effects and those reactions that warrant a call to your veterinarian.
 
Normal Responses
After intramuscular vaccination, it’s fairly common for horses to experience mild, temporary side effects for a few hours such as:
• Local muscle soreness or swelling
• Fatigue
• Fever
• Loss of appetite
• Lack of energy or alertness 
 
However, if the signs listed above last for more than 24 hours, you should consult your veterinarian as soon as possible to inform them of what is going on with the horse. This will allow your veterinarian to provide you with treatment advice and care instructions.
 
Causes for Possible Concern
Sometimes more serious side effects, and in some cases, life-threatening events, can occur, including:
• Hives
• Difficulty breathing
• Collapse
• Colic
• Swelling at the injection site several days post vaccination.
These more serious side effects are rare, but do require immediate consultation, and, in some cases, medical intervention.
 
Working with your veterinarian is the best way to ensure your horse is being evaluated based upon its particular needs. Many veterinarians follow the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ recommended guidelines for core vaccinations.  Veterinarians can also be helpful in determining the need for other risk-based vaccinations based on an assessment of your geographic threats and travel plans. They are also familiar with the proper handling and administering of vaccines, which is important because those handled improperly can actually become ineffective or may increase the risk of side effects.

CH note: This advice comes from a leading vaccine manufacturer and is provided in excerpts.


Come chat on Facebook.

For lots of up to date news and events please fan us on facebook at www.facebook.com/CatskillHorse.
Want to chat too? Check out www.facebook.com/CatskillEquestrianGroup


Promote your event.

Have an event planned? Send us the details and we'll post it our events calendar page.


Do You Love To Write?

While Catskill Horse has a staff of professional contributing writers/reporters/photographers, Catskill Horse is always interested in receiving submissions of articles and photos for publication from new writers. We can provide a photo or authorship credit for those works accepted. Please do not submit via mail - we prefer email submission. Send your ideas/articles/wrap up features/photos to us at info@CatskillHorse.org marked attention Editorial. If accepted you will be notified via email.


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